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for businesses to discriminate against lbgt people. it was pushed by people who fear that the freedom of religion is under attack. but she pushed back saying there were no instances in arizona of religious freedom taking a backseat to lbgt right. >> senate bill 1062 does not address a specific concern related to religious liberty in arizona. i have not heard of one example in arizona where business owners' religious liberty has been violated. >> the thing is, arizona is not an outlier here anymore. at least 12 other states are looking at similar bills. oregon could even see something on its ballot this year. several of these efforts have run into roadblocks, sure, or even political abandonment following the outcry in arizona. but it is, we think, all part of a larger strategy on the right, invoking religion as a trump card in venues where there was actually a consensus that other, shall we say, nonreligious values rule. i'm thinking about like profits in the corporate board room or science in the public hospital. and where arizona's effort failed spectacularly, a more careful interpretation and v
for that in religion. we're talking about marriages, about those ceremonies that really when you participate in them as described in the package about being artistic, you're affirming of something that runs counter to your religious beliefs. >> you're saying i can't ban -- i have the bill in front of me two pages for me saying you can do this if the person's refusal to act is moat have aed by religious belief. you're saying to me if i'm -- someone could ban me from coming in if i was married to another woman but not if i was simply a lesbian and not married to the woman? it's gay marriage that's your problem? >> that is -- it sets in place this has to be a religious belief that is deeply held and you can't just come up and create a religion. you can't come up and say, i'm not going to serve somebody this food and that would be inconsistent with a christian world view. christians want to serve people. where the issue is, and this is what happened in new mexico, what drove this was that you had a christian photography if i company that was sued for not photographing a same sex wedding ceremony. that's
a bill that would allow businesses to refuse services to gays and lesbian by invoking religion. jan brewer vetoed the bill. but cecilia vega reports it will not stop a nationwide debate. >> reporter: it was the arizona bill that ignited a national firestorm. >> nobody rides in the back of the bus and everybody sits at the lunch counter. we fought that battle once. that's what this battle is. >> reporter: with polls showing a public shift on gay rights. a majority of americans now support same-sex marriage. the pressure for arizona governor jan brewer to veto the bill was fierce. major american companies came out swinging, calling arizona's law bad for business. in the end, brewer vetoed the bill. >> religious liberty is a core american and arizona value. so is non-discrimination. >> reporter: this as some of the most conservative states have become the new battle ground in the same-sex marriage war. a federal judge striking down texas' ban. so-called religious freedom laws like the one so fiercely debated in arizona, now seen as yet another weapon in the fight by supporters of the b
to see again that religion was used to veil discrimination. it was just really a disappointing piece of legislation that it even came forward at all, and that in 2014 we're evening discussing this time of policy. i saw you on lawrence o'donnell's show last night, and you said you normally don't make public reference to your sexuality, but you had to take a strong stand, given what was happens in your home state. >> you know, i think sometimes you have to stand up and speak for what's right. when a bill like this moves through the political process, you know, whether it was discriminating against the lbgt community or another minority group, it's important to stand up and speak for what's right and speak from the heart. if my story helped illuminate that or provided insight to the other members of the house of representatives, to the type of impact it would have on individuals, then i hope that it helped. >> it's interesting, many decisions we have seen in our country have been made through the motivations of money, whether you person was afraid they would lose money or could stand to
against gays on the basis of religion. but iowa congressman steve king is still defending that law. why? king says that sex orientation is what he calls self-professed behavior. and therefore he says business owners might not know just who they can or cannot discriminate against. >> it's clear in the civil rights section of the code that you can't discriminate against people based upon -- i'm not sure i got the list right, but race, creed, religion, color of skin, those kind of things. and there is nothing mentioned in there on self-professed behavior. the one thing i reference when i say self-professed is how do you know who to discriminate against? they have to tell you. and are they then setting up a case? is this about bringing a grievance or is it actually about a service they would like to have. >> so what mr. king is saying there is that customers could claim to be gay just to entrap business owners into discriminating against them so they could then seek legal reparations. here is a further question. is religion not by his wording also self-professed? >>> finally, "12 years a sl
in georgia yes two bills with religion our liberty in their titles and were seen as a way to possibly discriminate against gay men and lesbian, go down in that. also in another conservative state. we are seeing a tidal wave on this issue that i think will be hard for people to resist in just about any corner of it. >> yeah, you put it that way. that's extraordinary, coming from how long you've been covering these state and national issues. jackie, when you look at the legal issues here which as we've said we're -- which combined with the political legislature, and then something else, jackie, which is the fact that these issues are being covered differently, i think, and not covered always on the sometimes conservative terms of calling it religious liberty. a lot of people support religious liberty, but they don't think that means it should be a cover for discrimination. >> well, yeah, i think one of the things that's been interesting, particularly with the republican party is the strain of libertarianism that's been infused recently, which is another reason why i think you see some r
burden a person's exercise of religion even if the burden results from a rule of general applicability, a rule applied to everybody. now what the law does, what the law would do, this law that the governor is looking at, is make a couple of amendments. first of all, it would not apply just to a person but to a business as well. so a business could assert a religious freedom interest. and basically what it would do is give businesses who refuse to serve someone for religious reasons a defense if they get sued. so that's how the law would change the current religious freedom restoration act. it would apply to businesses. they could go to court if they're sued and say, you know, it was our religious -- this is our religious freedom. it would violate it to serve someone if we believe that would interfere with our practices and beliefs. >> so, pete, there are people who are making the argument against the law saying, well, listen, maybe a muslim business owner will say, i don't want to serve christians or maybe the law could be used in some other way. somebody who had an objection, let's sa
. >>> arizona governor jan brewer was forced to veto legislation that would use religion to codify hate and deny basic rights. major corporations like american airlines, at&t, the nfl and mlb, in addition to business leaders throughout the state urged the governor to veto the bill. while similar measures have been introduced in about a dozen other republican-controlled states like kansas, south dakota and tennessee, by the end of the week, the moral and economic arguments seem to have had an impact. now this comes as we've seen a rapidly growing acceptance of lbgt americans and issues like same-sex marriage. a federal judge ordered kentucky to immediately begin recognizing same-sex marriages from other states. so that suggests to me that the reason for the proliferation of these hateful measures is fear. just like the anti-women's rights and anti-voting rights legislation we've seen in states, these measures represent fear of a changed reality. but the question now is whether or not the events of last week represent a final tipping point in ensuring equal rights for lbgt americans. let's bring i
to gays or people of religions that do things they don't agree with. several state senators regret their vote for this bill but one republican is still supporting this. >> they are free agents. felt if they have responded to all of the pressure, it has been intense, that is okay. they are all good friends of mine. steve pierce voted for this bill but now he is ptelling the governor he hopes she vetoes it. how do you respond to your colleague that says you and others have caved on this bill? >> he is a good friend. we have not caved. we had reservations at the beginning and we saw the outcry and realized it wasn't right. >> the bill says a business owner, church owner or coperation can deny service if motivated by religious belief if it burdens their belief. what did afraid would happen? >> it has gone from reality into perception and what is perceived is overriding of the bill. perception is it is a bad and going to be specific to gays. we didn't intend it that way. my colleague and i never thought it would be like that but that is the perception and horrible for the damage it is g
of the law substantially burdenening somebody's exercise of religion. arizona is one of many that has laws like that. so what was different about this arizona law is that it would have expanded the law to apply not just to individuals but to businesss that get sued by someone in a private lawsuit, someone that they refuse to serve and what got the sponsors of the bill concerned was a decision last year in neighboring new mexico when the supreme court there ruled against a be queer key photographers who refused to photograph the ceremony of two women. and this is exactly at the heart of the challenge to the obamacare law that the supreme court will hear next month. >> gwen rattled off this week's different developments. you've got fights in state houses and in courthouses. what else is going on? >> a texas judge became the latest to strike down a ban on same sex marriage saying that it's -- there's no good reason to do that. gwen: how many states have done that? >> in terms of court action, six or seven. we have 17 states in which same sex marriage is allowed. we have a trial that starred t
religions give people guilt, tom. >> andy, this sinting. i was obsessed with jewish girls in high school and college. i asked one of my girlfriends, what is going on with the jewish religion? she said, we believe the same thing as you, except jesus and hell. >> that's not bad. when people were asked to write about heaven and hell those who picked hell reported more sadness. maybe sadder people chose to write about hell than heaven. >> it is a matter of focus. >> i was saying they were sadder to begin with and that's why they chose to write about hell. it was not writing about hell that made them sadder. it is a chicken and egg thing which is a inett tau fore thing. >> which came first, the chicken or the egg? do you believe in hell and if so what are your thoughts? >> the club i worked in last weekend unconfirmed that. it was pure hell. it was walking hell. it was the oldest people just -- it was like working purgatory. i was in -- >> you believe in purgatory? that's a catholic thing. i believe in purgatory. >> you can't make the decision right away. it is based on a true story. that's w
of legislation. tell me how this is tied to, and maybe differs from arizona's freedom of religion laws. >> that is an interesting question, how did arizona get to this moment? i wish we could speak to that, but where would we begin. the freedom of religion law passed in 1999 and existed at the federal lovel level in 1993. we inserted a line in this newest incarnation of the bill that talks specifically about a belief being sincerely held. that's where people are getting hung up and feeling like everybody feels that their beliefs are sincerely held. that is language added to this bill, and some say it clarifies. >> say the governor signs this piece of legislation into law, and businesses turn away gays and lesbians lead to go discrimination lawsuits. would it be up to a judge to determine the sincerity of a business ow owner's religious convictions? >> reporter: in arizona the state does not prohibit gay or lesbian. in three of our largest cities they are. in that case the city would have to bring case against the individual business owner. so a person, i, couldn't bring a lawsuit again
hear people don't want to see movies about religion, don't want to learn about god on friday and saturday night. i was sharing with you the study out said the biggest moneymaking movies in the last year had religion as a theme. what do you make of that, mark? >> it certainly is one nation under god. no question about that. just maybe some people in the media don't quite understand what driving america, what built america. it's not surprisingly thematically even non-bible movies have that story of redemption against all odds, biblical values because it's naturally what americans love. >> don't you remember the reaction when "passion of the christ" came out in 2004. they were like, this will never be anything. i remember driving to the airport in a cab and listening to the radio station and people announcing it were just stunned that it had done so well. now 10 years later with your movie coming out, they are not going to be that stunned when it does really well, are they? >> we don't know. all we know is we made a beautiful film that is exciting on the one hand, plays out like
's exercise of religion without showing compelling government interest. the orange states are states that if passed rfra-like provisions by court decision. you can see that in the wall street journal if you want to learn more about that. we are skipping with our colors. renÉe is waiting in california. good morning. caller: i wanted to correct one thing here. iticus that talks about man laying down with man. you guys get the views from the homosexual side but you also need to get the other side here. i don't believe in same-sex marriage. i hate the fact that people always want to compare homosexuality with racial. that has nothing to do with it. it is a lifestyle that they choose. i am an a store and christian, i should not be forced to make a cake for two women or two men. that is my right. the thing about it is, god will in the end.al say his were never changes. it is all the same. it was a sin before and it's a sin now. god does not hate the sinner, he hates the sin. you worry about the example of the wedding cake. that example also brought up in today's washington post in their l
exercise of religion, sincerely held religious beliefs. >> opponents of the bill claimed victory for an open attack on gays. >> this showed the nation that not all arizonians are like extremists, and that there are good people, and we want to lead the country forward, not backwards. >> a statement was issued, praising her decision. >> major corporations weighed in too. apple, american airlines, delta and the n.f.l. all urged governor jan brewer to veto the measure. >> it was a combination. business community and activist. >> it sent a message to the governor. >> and speaking of the business community, supporters of the bill have been saying that there is a lot of support by local businesses. one of our producers here made several calls, 50 businesses, dry cleaners, hair salons, and could not find a local business behind it. >> thank you. we should point out the veto of the bill in arizona does not end the debate open over religious freedom nationwide. it got further, being a signature away from the governor to become war. similar balls failed to pass in kansas, idaho, south dakot
the door to allowing people to use religion as an excuse for prejudice. >> what's happening to all these people who are being discriminated against, their religious freedoms are being restrained or not allowed, and so we're still waiting for examples. >> reporter: tahman bradley, abc news, washington. >>> breaking news now in the deepening crisis in ukraine. armed gunmen have seized government buildings in the crimea region. that's a strategic peninsula in the black sea. there's no word yet on what the armed men want but they put up a russian flag and a sign that said, crimea is russian. ukraine's pro-russian president was ousted last week. >>> the acting president is warning russian troops to keep out of ukraine. so is the u.s. secretary of state. kerry says russian intervention would be a grave mistake. russia questioned the legitimacy of the new ukrainian leadership. ukrainian security forces are on high alert. >>> more breaking news from overnight. smoke in the cabin of a delta connection flight that landed in oakland, california. the plane made it to the jetway when about 80 p
that discriminate on race, religion or sexual orientation. >> other companies that have taken a similar action because of this policy? >> yes, there are organizations like major league soccer and martin that cut the fund for now. >> thank you. >> and update on the top stories and then it is real money at the top of the hour. there's more to financial news than the ups and downs of the dow. for instance, can fracking change what you pay for water each month? have you thought about how climate change can affect your grocery bill? can rare minerals in china affect your cell phone bill? or how a hospital in texas could drive up your healthcare premium? i'll make the connections from the news to your money real. >> this is al jazeera america, we have a look at the top stories, russia denies the rofrt reports of issuing an ultimatum to ukraine. the russian ambassador is saying it is there at the request of the former president of ukraine and it is making investors nerving outstanding. russia is a big energy producer and fear of reducing the supplies the driving the prices higher. president obama is
of the largest cities including hiking on saturday and would be governed by the new religion in the capital. like i was making a living even though i need a ukranian. get your money. all i can do with how to tackle rising market i went to sam have had their hands on. the new country failed to prevent relief we don't want such a country we want our country to peace. we used to work and pay taxes thank you. what started as a peaceful rally turned violent when pro russian activists cost with no was named to the authorities in kenya with tear gas report abuse as well as books in stakes. more than a hundred were injured as protesters managed to gain control of the administration building and even replace the ukrainian flag with the russian one. before saturday the ministry sell the hunter region building was protected by the so called self defense. off mike down now it is secured by the police forces and is still great deal of uncertainty as to who actually holds the power here other cities in the east and southeast again sitting at the critical hogan's oh so she'll be distrusted the new government wh
debate over gay rights, religion, and discrimination. >> after weighing all of the arguments, i have vetoed senate bill 1062 moments ago. to the supporters of this legislation, i want you to know that i understand that long-held norms about marriage and family are being challenged as never before. our society is undergoing many dramatic changes. however, i sincerely believe that senate bill 1062 has the potential to create more problems than it purports to solve. >> and you know, it's kind of a -- >> it's not really a defense -- >> no, the decision was met with cheers outside the capitol building. she was met with major corporations and -- the thing i don't like about twitter. to me, maybe i didn't know every nuance and detail about it, but just the idea that a lunch counter that someone would say, no, you're not being served here, somebody -- that was enough for me. i didn't realize how many different situations twitter people could come up with to show me that there was some time when this might make sense. it's like, i don't want to know all your splitting hair opinions about why
religion. >>> "american hustle" could win ten academy awards on sunday but it has heavy competition from "gravity." we will look at all the big nominees and actresses in the race and the actor called the one to beat. >> it's friday. right now it's time to show you some of the this morning's headlines from around the globe. kerry kennedy was acquitted this morning of drunk driving. a jury acquitted her. jurors needed two days to reach their verdict. >>> usa today says stethoscopes are covered in germs. researchers say stethoscope cleaning should be standard practice. >>> britain's telegraph says babies born by c section are at risk to be obese. >>> the washington post looks at why viewers are upset with a "jeopardy" contestant. his playing style goes against tradition. he asked the all-time "jeopardy" champion about the newcomer this month. >> what do you think about chew who is winning it in an unorthodoxed way. >> this is smart play. >> he solved all the big daily doubles before his rivals find him. >>> and then the dogsled race kicks off this weekend in alaska. the
allowed business owners to refuse to serve gays by citing their religion beliefs. here is what the governor said just minutes ago. >> after weighing all the arguments i have vetoed senate bill 1062 moments ago. to the supporters of this legislation i want you to know that i understand that long held norms about marriage and family are being challenged as never before. our society is undergoing many dramatic changes. however, i sincerely believe that senate bill 1062 has the potential to create more problems than it purports to solve. i could divide in arizona in ways we could never imagine and no one would ever want. religious liberty is a core, american and arizona value. so is nondiscrimination. going forward, let's turn the ugliness of the debate over senate bill 1062 into a renewed search for greater respect and understanding among all arizonans and americans. >> many people owned this bill because -- opposed this bill because they believe it provided political will to discriminate. brian rooney explains. >> protest was loud, where the legislature once again they said made
is pouring rights to religion out the window. host: what do you mean? caller: the bill is for private individuals to have their own -- that have their own business to serve whatever customer they want to serve. i think that's the law anyway. universal law. they should be able to do that. nobody should be against that. not like telling somebody else how to run their own business because you're a consumer. host: what about the issue of discriminating on the basis of race. are you opening the door to allow that? based on religious views? >> no. because i think that's a person's thing, how your skin is is how you're born. how you choose to conduct yourself, that's something you choose. host: from florida. >> i want to -- caller: i want to bring up a point, the people that are discriminating and oppressing others are always going to cry that they are being oppressed and discriminated against when ople seek to end the discrimination and oppression that they are performing. did that make sense to you? host: appreciate you chiming in with your thoughts. here are the thoughts of senator john m
religion has the most force. the courts are like the worst place in order to try to get a religious belief codified or encoded into law. because the way in which the supreme court. >> you have to have a secular purpose for the law. when religious right was on the offense, what it did was to use a ballot initiative. everyone goes into the voting booth and votes their religious convictions. you can't second guess that. now that those statutes have become to be struck down by the courts, giving us secular reasons. now that they're playing defense, what the religious right is doing is saying, let's rely on the free exercise clause in order to allow individuals to sort these claims in court. in some ways, arizona was the easiest case, she showed no evidence of religious discrimination against businesses. land of legal, gay rights organization told me today they had received almost 500 complaints over the past four years about lgbt discrimination in arizona. >> which is legal. >> it starts to feel like, you hurt my fist when i hit your face argument. but i think as we move to other states, that
religion and then fly into your eyes. >> this is obviously a relief for you. they served like 40 years and isn't that close enough to a life term anyway? it is not like they could do much now because they are so old. do you buy that a? >> they should do it the way the white house does with turkeys. put information and allow the people to vote, you know what i mean? this is cletis, he is a member and this is gold tooth. he is uh allergic to cleetis. >> that is true coming from you. >> you are a family of five, but got probation because you said the judge was, quote, super hot. how do you feel about this new thing? >> i am very grateful to have received a fair trial and have been acquitted. i don't understand this idea of governors pardoning people or giving them parole. after going through the process then one person can let them go after a board reviews whatever? but it is ultimately their say? that is ridiculous. these poor vehicle times who experienced comfort and know they have life in prison, then that goes away. >> that is the thing that kills me. they were hugging and crying 20 y
service to gays and lesbians or anyone that disagrees with the business people's religion. so a muslim taxi driver could ,efuse to take a jewish person or a single woman traveling by herself. rush limbaugh has no credibility at all. the legislation was trying to write in prejudice, and to use his words, bullying and coercion into civil law and that is not allowed. a great have changed deal. when you have this massive corporate lobby putting pressure , isn't your traditional, you know, gay and lesbian activist and their supporters -- you had corporate america saying no to prejudice. >> because they recognize the economic realities here. g power as well as our allies as well as -- you know, i maintain the majority of americans are good, decent people, and they will not tolerate this kind of abuse of a legal process. the corporations recognize that as well. marriott, american airlines, delta airlines, apple was going to build a manufacturing plant in mesa, arizona -- vetott romney tweeted to the bill. >> leadership on the republican side. the two u.s. senators from the arizona side as wel
of their religion, that's already covered under current law. the only group not covered under current or federal state law in arizona for nondiscrimination is gays and lesbians. everybody else is already covered. >> that's a separate issue, of course. just to go back to what you were saying, if you actually read the language of the law, it was a terribly drawn law. it was full of language like if there's a compelling state interest, then you can compel someone to even violate what he calls his religious conscience. the point is i think reasonable people can agree and we should find the areas of agreement, not disagreement. for instance, i do think we should agree that people should not be forced by government to do something that seriously violates conscience if it is based on a legitimate religious recognized in your church. however, that doesn't give you the right to ban access to what was called public accommodations. that was the basis for the greatest legislation in this area, the civil rights act of 1964. i think we ought to go back to that and specify public accommodations. >> but again f
a hotly debated religion bill, business leaders across the state are calling on governor jan brewer to veto the proposed law or risk damaging the state's image and its economic recovery. >> opponents now include the arizona chamber of commerce, the arizona super bowl host committee, apple which has major interests in this state, and both americans airlines and mare rot. now, as local and national businesses are making their voices heard, politicians both in and outside of arizona are pushing to distance themselves from the law. three senators from arizona who voted for the bill are now, actually, get this, are urging the governor to veto it. and state senator steve pierce told chris hayes last night, it was some sort of crazy mixup. >> i believe it was going to be slowed down, wasn't going to come to the floor as soon as it did. i can tell you there's a number of us that we were terxting eac other madly, do we go with it, do we not? so we made a mistake. that's about all i can tell you is we went the wrong way. >> yes. they went the wrong way. and it's too late to reverse that becau
with her if she could come up with one single example of discrimination based on religion in arizona that people of faith have suffered through. she couldn't come up with one other than hypotheticals that maybe might happen. but she had no actual example of it actually having occurred. that's interesting because governor brewer specifically pointed that out. i want to play some of that exchange we had with nancy barta, one of the authors of s b 1062. >> senator, do you have any actual example of someone in arizona being forced to do something against their religious beliefs? >> well, in arizona it could be happening all the time, yes. >> do you have an actual example? >> well, surely. people may be being asked to -- >> i mean where it's actually happened. >> well, obviously if people aren't bringing it to court we don't know about it at this point. but we do know that without this law, people would not be able to defend themselves in court. >> but again, you can't name actually one example where this has happened. because people opposed to this say look, this is a problem -- this is
provides that, quote, government shall not substantially burden a person's exercise of religion explicitly expanding that protection to allow businesses to cite a violation of their own religious beliefs as a defense if they're sued for failing to provide service. the bill was inspired by a new mexico supreme court ruling against a wedding photographer who refused service to a same-sex couple, and it massed quickly through the very conservative-controlled state legislature in arizona last week. in the last few days, pressure on brewer to veto the bill has grown from almost every corner. the arizona story crossed the threshold from political feeding frenzy into the mainstream. it was showing up on every platform yesterday, from espn to late-night talk shows. and though brewer claimed she was not influenced by cheers and boos from the crowd, it was clear from the outset that her state, whose reputation has already been tarnished over the years in the wake of the state's 2010 immigration law, had a lot to lose. on wednesday, the nfl, quote, began investigating the necessary steps to move next
religion, also under consideration at this point. joining me here onset to make sense of all of this is one of the big voices from the last few years of lgbt advocacy, roberta caplin argued edie windsor's case before the supreme court. i can only imagine how stressful it was. you had an entire movement riding on your shoulders. thank you for joining us and trying to make sense of the latest events. we see yesterday's news out of texas, similar rulings before that in virginia and kentucky. what do you think the future holds for those cases? what do you think the next thing to hit the supreme court might be? >> the windsor case came down at the end of june. since that decision there have been 15 court decisions in courts throughout the country in places like as you mentioned, kentucky, virginia, utah, oklahoma, all relying on windsor. i don't think that's surprising at all. windsor is about the core dignity of gay people and how they have the same type of dignity and should get the same respect as everyone else. once the supreme court has said that as i predicted back in the summer, it's all
religion, but as thomas jefferson was so shocked to find out, there is one religion that has a small component of it that believes that a sure way to paradise is to kill innocent men, women and children because they don't those religiously like radicals do. it's the reason thomas jefferson got his own copy of the koran that the library of congress still has. he wanted to see for himself. he was so well-read. he couldn't believe there was a religion that had a book, a holy book for a basis that would allow anyone to interpret it in such a way as to kill innocent men, women and children. there have been, to be sure, purported christians over the ages that thought it was their duty to go about and brutalize people who were not christians, but anyone who studies the teachings of christ about how we're to individually act knows those would not have been christians doing the kind of iolence that they did. it's not supported by the bible . what is supported in the bible is if you do evil, be afraid because god does not give the government to sort in vain. individually we're not supposed vi
. we all know religion was cited repeatedly in a different context for racial segregation, then people moved on and a lot of religious believers today do not look at their teachings any more as a justification for that. >> well, that's because that was perversion of scripture. look, scripture doesn't change. the guide is the same yesterday, today, forever, the evangelical will tell you and because they believe that way, to use scripture in a way to prof ul gait segregation is wrong and a misuse of scripture. that's a separate altogether, ari. >> i don't want to go too deeply theological, and you might just win that debate, if it comes to certain parts of the book i don't know as well, but what i also want to get in is the politics on 2016. margie, are there going to be republicans that decide when they are running, they need to be the first mainstream republican presidential candidate to be open to marriage equality? margie first. >> i think there are some republicans who might be a candidate for doing that. i don't know if that's a winning strategy in some of these early primary state
businesses to turn away gay customers. in the name of religion. >> arizona governor jan brewer is under intense pressure to veto, tweeting overnight that she will do the right thing for the state. more now from abc's cecilia vega. >> outrage at the state capitol. as governor jan brewer faces a decision, does she sign into law a bill in the name of religious freedom to refuse to serve gay people or veto it. but companies are pouncing, saying the law would create an unfriendly climate that's bad for business. joining the chorus, marriott hotels. tech giant, apple. which has plans to open a 2,000 job high-tech plant in the state. and american airlines. whose ceo wrote, this bill send the wrong message. mitt romney chimed in urging a veto. even the nfl weighs in. with next year's super bowl set to be played in arizona, the league says it supports tolerance and inclusiveness. >> it is discrimination couched behind the belief that i can hide behind my religious beliefs. >> the opposition has been loud, but you from the backers of this bill so far we are hearing silence. we tried to find busin
to get rid ofr race, religion, tribalism and melt them all down through a powerful centralized your accuracy and make them into a new soviet man. it collapsed because when against human nature. the imperative of the human nature. when it collapsed under the weight of human nature, there was no explosion of tribe and religion that is always under the surface. you will never rid the world of tribalism and ethnic identity. the same thing is happening now in america. we slowly lose our liberty as we have to have a powerful keepalized bureaucracy to the growing ethnic tensions in line. that is what is happening here. host: do you think there's anything that should be done right now in the ukraine? caller: no. let them do what they are going to do anyway. one thing i'd do is i admire putin because he is a nationalist. the russian people are dying out. he stopped international adoption and months to rescue his children with them. he is encouraging that through different things. i admire the guy. i wish i would have a leader like that. from john calling in pennsylvania this morning. the sen
. businesses could deny service to gay customers based on religion. jan crawford is in washington with some of the backlash and new details. jan, good morning. >> reporter: good morning, norah and charlie. last night back out in arizona, brewer tweeted, i assure you, as always, i will do the right thing for the state of arizona. now, she's expected to make her decision no later than friday and insiders are saying it is increasingly likely that she is going to consider the right thing here to be a veto. [ chants ] >> veto! >> reporter: since the arizona legislature passed the bill last week, there have been almost daily protests. [ chants ] >> shame on you! >> reporter: it's all part of a tidal wave of opposition to the proposed state lay which would make it easier for businesses because of their religious beliefs, to deny service against gays and lesbians. supporters say the law is designed to protect religious freedom, especially for small businesses like wedding photographers and bakeries that may have religious objections to same-sex marriages. k cathi harrod helped
gays. it could not be further than that. people need to be able to exercise their religion freely in our state. >> adam housely has the latest. >> even the governor herself is calling the bill controversial. she returned home to a fire storm in arizona and tweeted out she is going to do the right for arizona. the republican lawmaker will go over it with the legislation and talk about the bill. it allows business owners to not serve or cooperate with customers. it is being seen mostly as as an anti-gay bill. american airlines, apple and other businesses are urging her to veto. the nfl hosting the super bowl and weighing in and the host committee said it would deal a significant blow to the economic growth potential and all sorts of heavy weights coming out against this. governor mccain is urging for a veto. and several lawmakers who pushed it through changed their mind >> we had reservations at the beginni beginning. we saw how it would damage to state and decided it wasn't right and we made a mistake. >> reporter: the bill's authors are saying their intention is being misconstrued
a national debate over gay rights, religion and discrimination. the decision of defused a national furor over gay rights and religious freedom. the bill was backed by republicans in the state legislator and was designed to give added protection from lawsuits to people who assert their religious beliefs and refusing service to gays. opponents called it and out both opponent call it a opeboth, it's called an opn attack on days that invited discrimination. the bill thrust arizona into the national spotlight last week after both chambers of legislator approved it. >> just today is rain brought a fresh layer of new snow to the sierra. caltran plows were moving the snow off of the sierra highways. meanwhile at area ski resorts, the new snow was welcome. >> we can use all the rain that we are getting. here's a live look at the rand pushing through the east i will have a full detail what to expect coming up. ♪ ♪ [ male announcer ] spring is calling. get sta-green fertilizer now just $8 at lowe's. ♪ >> welcome back. we are looking at the weather. we have light rain leaving the mid peninsula. we
blooded murder. british government said this was nothing to do with religion or faith. of course the jury in the court agreed. it took them just an hour and a half, 90 minutes to sentence these men to convicted these men and for the four men of the jury to say they were guilty. >> sentencing has been delayed over life tariffs. can you explain what these are? >> the life terms, life is the mandatory sentence for murder, so these men will get life, but life in the u.k. does not always mean life, it comes with a caveat in a lot of cases. it could be with a minimum term of 20, 30, 40 years, therefore a killer could potentially be released in the future. this is the kind of case where you have members of the public, newspapers saying throw away the key, they should never be builds. the trial judge said when these men were convicted, he was delaying sentencing, waiting for a key court case which we all knew was coming, it happened last week here, the court of appeals judges ruled that some killers can be sentenced without question to life behind bars, their entire life, they will never, ever be
of religion are in the first amendment to the united states constitution. >> yes, they are. >> when should they take a state? this law in arizona you have to prove as a businessman you were being burdened in your religious exercise. it didn't give the right of people to just say, i discriminated based on my faith. you had 11 republicans and democrats, harvard law professors and others saying this has been mischaracterized. >> you didn't need the law because there is no special protection. i want to move off that point to the point you just made. substantial burden to my faith. how is it a substantial burden to your faith to take photos of a gay wedding if you are a catholic? >> i think if people say, listen, i don't want to sanction polygamy or gay marriage or anything other than traditional marriage, we need to respect that. if you don't like it, shop around. it's not hard for gays to find somebody who is going to take a picture of them is there? >> how is it a substantial burden to your catholic faith to do that? where in your faith does it say that doing that is very wrong? >> you know
a controversial bill that divided the state. supporters touted the legislation as protecting religion freedom for businesses but critics said sb 1060 denying legal service to same-sex couples. the governor's decision follows intense pressure, including thousands of petitions from human rights activists and press releases from some of the nation's largest corporation. among them is american airlines and daeelta and apple. >> instead, this is the first policy bill to cross my desk. senate bill 1062 does not address a specific or present concern related to religious liberty in arizona. i've not heard one example in arizona where business owners religious liberty has been violated. the bill is broadly worded and could result in negative consequences. after weighing all of the argument i have vetoed senate bill 1062 moments ago. >> john mccain and jeff plak who are republican senators publicly lobbied for the governor's veto and hailed the decision they made. >> mark, call it like she is. governor brewer was looking at business. she heard from the commissioner of the nfl they may take the super bo
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